Archive for October, 2011

SAVE: Daily Deal Site for Inland Empire

Saturday, October 29th, 2011



My Quick Deals Offers Discounts on Inland Valley Businesses

Somehow I stumbled onto a new daily deal site that I want to share with friends and neighbors in Claremont and nearby areas. It is called MyQuickDeals and it is like Groupon and the other daily deal sites only better because all the deals are for local businesses!

 

 

 

Like right now, they have a deal for half off at Mt Fuji Garden center. You spend $20 and get $40 worth at Mt. Fuji! Another deal on now is for $99 you can get an IPL Photofacial and Glycolic Peel at a local Medspa–normally that would go for $400. Another deal was $7 for $14 for of yogurt or gelato.

MyQuickDeals is a local business. And they need more local people to sign up. It costs nothing to sign up. You are not bombarded with emails etc. Just one email a day. The offers look good. And the company is giving part of the proceeds to schools and local charities.

Here is some info about them from an email I got from them”

We are family owned and operated, and based in Upland. We started our business two months ago hoping to do three things: (1) provide truly localized deals to our neighbors in the west end of the Inland Empire, (2) provide local businesses with an alternative to Groupon & Living Social, which both charge businesses more, and (3) give back part of our proceeds to help local charities and school programs. For our business to work we need to get more people knowing about and using MyQuickDeals.

I am inviting you to check them out and sign up to support them and other local businesses that offer deals. You will also be helping yourself because it looks like they have some great deals! Let me know what you think and if you take advantage of any of their offers. Pass the word.

Spa for Women Shuts Doors . . . Now What?

Tuesday, October 25th, 2011


Totally Bummed

When the Spa for Women in Upland, CA, shut its doors unexpectedly last week, many of us members were shocked and devastated. Where do we go now? Although the gym on Foothill near Mountain was not the classiest place, it offered the basics at a reasonable price and fellow members and staff felt like family. Many women have been going to the gym for decades.

Talking to fellow members I hear words of grief. “Devastated.” So Upset.” “Don’t know what I am going to do.” So bummed” “Mad.” “Lost” “That place was perfect for me . . . now what am I gonna do?”

The best thing about the Spa was the people. The instructors: all competent, friendly, and caring. The members: all down-to-earth women. You could go to the gym in your sweats without putting your make-up on and it was all good. I was there 13 years.

So now I am looking for a gym with yoga, step, Zumba, weights, and a pool that is close, affordable and has a clientele that makes me comfortable. I need a gym in Claremont or Upland or someplace close . . . too far and I will end up not going.

Looking on Yelp at reviews and it is not encouraging.

Many of us are wondering why the owner did not at the least try to arrange a discount at another gym for us. After all, most of us paid for multiple-year gym memberships, and now it looks like we are just out the money. I had 6 years left on mine.

With no FB page or email list, we are all just left to find a new gym home on our own. If you were a Spa member, please let me know what your plans are. Leave a comment below. I also started a Facebook group Bummed About the Spa for Women in Upland Closing in the hopes of reaching out to others in my situation. Maybe if we trade notes we can help each other find new gyms that work for each of us. Join it by going to Bummed about Spa for Women in Upland Closing Group.

Please pass the word along. Thank you.

If you want to contact me directly: email kim at creativezazz.com

 

By the way:  there is a great new daily deal site just for the Inland Empire.  Local company that just started up and they need members. Check it out.

What to Wear to the Revolution?

Monday, October 24th, 2011


It didn’t take long for the masses to try to make money off the movement.

 

Print-on-demand (POD) sites like Cafepress and Zazzle now have a bazillion versions of “I am the 99%” t-shirts and other power-to-the-people products. What to make of all these people trying to cash in? Are they crass capitalists undercutting the whole ethos of the Occupy idea? Regular folks (out of work? underpaid?) trying to pay the rent anyway they know how? Or creative artists supporting the message while supporting themselves?

Maybe a little of each. But I’ve decided the marketing of Occupy is OK as long as the t-shirts and bumper stickers and cups are coming from individuals, not corporations with highly compensated executives. In fact, I’ve whipped up a few Occupy designs myself.

One thing I like about buying off the POD sites is that at least you don’t end up with a huge corporate logo all over your chest. What’s with that anyway? T-shirts should belong to the proletariat, shouldn’t they? T-shirts started out utilitarian in the early 1900s when the Navy issued them to sailors. By the time the Depression rolled around (the early one, not this one) the comfy, cheap shirts were de rigueur for farmers and others who worked outside.


The plain white t-shirt look became popular with guys after World War II (Think Marlon Brando in Streetcar Named Desire). In the 60s hippies discovered the tee made a perfect canvas for tie-dye, and in the 70s it became popular for slogans.

Brooke shields jeans pic

But by the 1980s companies were plastering their own logo on the outside of clothing. This unfortunate trend started with stitched crocodiles and polo ponies on the chests of preppy men. When Calvin Klein’s name famously appeared on the jeans pocket of young Brooke Shield’s butt, retailers learned consumers would pay double for the “status” of conspicuous designer labels. No matter that flaunting your wealth is gauche, logos quickly found their way onto purses, sunglasses, flip flops and especially, t-shirts.

Nowadays it’s impossible to buy a t-shirt without a logo on it. And that’s a drag. As my son put it: “Why would I want to be a walking billboard? They should pay me to wear the shirt if they put their logo on it!” A brilliant marketing idea, really, for them to con us into being an unpaid part of their advertising campaign. But it’s time for the free ride to stop.

The more radical Sans Culottes in the French Revolution were working class who wore long pants.

So, if you like one of these “real people” designs, go ahead and make a statement by buying one. In the French Revolution, the radical militants of the working class were known as the “sans-culottes” because they wore long pants, not the fancy shmancy silk knee-breeches of the more moderate bourgeois. Maybe today’s Occupy crowd can be known as “sans-logo” for eschewing brand-name t-shirts. Instead of being a walking billboard, they can be a walking protest sign . . . and at the same time support a real live artist. The hyper-PC can even pick t-shirts made-in-America of all-organic cotton from POD sites . . . all designed by some regular guy. Wearing one of these masterpieces, you can put down your cardboard sign and still broadcast your message.

Of course, you could just go out an buy plain white beefy T’s and a Sharpie and write your message on your chest.

I put up a list of my favorite Occupy t-shirt designs (some my own, some by others) on a Squidoo lens. Stop by and let me know which ones you like best.

You can check out my designs by clicking on the panel below. You can FB “Like” the one you like best. Or just buy it.


Look for a personalized gift at Zazzle.

If you want to make your very own design, click on the banner below and try out Zazzle. Very easy to use. For a limited time, I have a coupon for $10 a Zazzle product.

Custom T-Shirts

Lots of deals on OWS merchandise at Amazon.


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